Tale Weavers/Saturday Mix: Poem – Free Verse – “Snuffed Out” #amwriting #poetry #TaleWeavers #SaturdayMix


Thanks to Michael of MindLoveMisery’s Menagerie for hosting TaleWeavers and a prompt/theme where light is the focus. Also, combining with Sarah from MindLoveMisery’s Menagerie May 12, 2018 Double Take Saturday Mix Prompt on the homophone words: cedar – an evergreen tree with seeder – one who broadcasts seeds, and days – more than one day with daze – to bewilder.


Credit: Samantha Lynch via Unsplash


I’ll never trace the curve of your lips,

Where it dips, and lick my thumb;

Your nip, a playful bite.

Your brows wiggle; eyes sapphire.

While we slide past maybes,

Sleek condos and greenery;

Cedar trees that sway,

A seed in my heart nourished.

Sharp grass intoxicating —

You claiming my mouth;

Sweeping of lips,

Slow and exquisite.

Sweat makes us stick.

I ache as I’ve never.

Your hand rests ‘neath my throat,

My pulse rapid and wild.

You’ve etched my heart,

I’ll never forget.

The wind rustling, and the flapping of wings,

Our breath in syncopation.

Fighting for air against —

Little deaths.

In a moment, a few minutes,

On a train—

Where we two met.

Potential flared; I turned —

Flustered.

The pain in my chest,

Will it lessen?

Dazed as the days drift,

I didn’t know your name.

Know the flame you kindled,

Would burn me.

My hearts lit with your light,

But the mischief in me,

Craves you both in deepest night,

And the blinding day;

Beneath the Mexican sun,

On tequila beaches.

Daylight to overwhelm,

The throb of pain,

Of possibility snuffed out.


©Mandibelle16.(2018) All Rights Reserved.

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Sunday Photo Fiction: Eat or Be Eaten #amwriting #nature #flashfiction


Thanks to Alistair Forbes for hosting SPF.

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A Mixed Bag

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A handsome hawk watched as a sparrow spreading its impressively small wings, approached the birdfeeder. This fellow was piggish and fed on the seed a while. His red-brown back and tail with dark black mixed in with red-brown, made him highly visible. 

After a while, the male sparrow flew away from the feeder back to his nest, and his mate appeared to come eat. She also ate an amazing amount of birdseed before flying back to her nest. The mama sparrow was plump but her feathers in comparison to the male, were dull to keep her and her chicks hidden. If his eyes weren’t so sharp, he would have barely noticed her. 

The hawk watched the couple from far above, his eyes sensing and studying their every momevement at their nest. He knew there were baby sparrows in the nest. Mostly, he was concerned about the fat sparrows. The babes he heard peeping were too tiny and shrivelly to eat. 

The hawk screeched, his loud cry deafening as he swooped down, his reddish feathers gleaming, a nightmare on wings. When the plump sparrows each returned to the feeder to eat more seed, the hawk mercilessly crunched them between his sharp razor beek and ate them one at a time. How they never suspected he was close, he didn’t understand. 

This was the natural world taking place, the food chain in action; though it might seem unfair and harsh it was how it was. But as the daylight darkened into night and the well fed hawk flew back to his own nest, a great horned owl swooped in for his own dinner. 

In the morning, a mother sparrow, having lost her own brood, landed near the nest where she heard the tiny birds chirping. She looked into the nest and chirped back and then sat among the chicks; she realized they were abandoned. 

Wary of of predators from her own past experiences, she waited to gather food until when she was sure it was safe. Perhaps nature sometimes made up for its treachery, even if the truth if the food chain was ‘eat or be eaten.’ 

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©Mandibelle16. (2016) All Rights Reserved. 

NaPoWriMo: Poem – Heirloom Seeds – Alaphabet Poem -“Various Seeds Alphabetically”


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And now, our (optional, as always) daily prompt! April is a time for planting things (at least where I am, in Washington DC – you may still be waiting for spring, or well into some other season!) At any rate, I’ve recently been paging through seed catalogs, many of which feature “heirloom” seeds with fabulous names. Consider the “Old Ivory Egg” tomato, the “Ozark Razorback” or “Fast Lady” cow-pea, “Neal’s Paymaster” dent corn, or the “Tongues of Fire” bush bean. Today, I challenge you to spend some time looking at the names of heirloom plants, and write a poem that takes its inspiration from, or incorporates the name of, one or more of these garden rarities. To help you out, here are links to the Southern Exposure Seed Exchange and the Baker Creek Seed Company. Also, here’s a hint – tomatoes seem to be prime territory for elaborate names. And who knows, maybe you’ll even find something to plant in your garden! Happy writing!

Please see NaPoWriMo for more information. Hated this prompt by the way! 

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Abundant Bloomsdale spinach: sounds tasty to me. You may think it’s odd but I like raw spinach in my salads.

Bisignano number two paste tomatoes: Not a huge fan of tomatoes unless, they’re in a sandwich, or made into tomato soup or sauce.

Cucuzzi Edible Gourd: I don’t think I’ve ever tasted a gourd; it’s not my kind of vegetable.

Dill, Long Island Mammoth: I love dill in certain dishes and foods. I especially adore dill pickles and nylsnki in dill sauce is heavenly.

Erlene’s Green Cotton: to make lovely cotton clothes out of; I love cotton in the summer to wear when it’s hot outside. Cotton breathes so it keeps you cool.

Four O’clock Don Pedro’s: mixed colours; don’t know what those are because I’m not a gardener. Flowers maybe?

German Johnson Tomato: I don’t know why there is so many kinds of Tomatos. The people in the Middle Ages thought they were poisonus you know.

Hopi Pink Flour Corn: Sounds like yummy corn to make flour with; is it truly pink?

Italiko Rosso Dandelion: Some people eat dandelions in salads, not me they’re weeds.

Jing Orange Okra seeds: I’m drawing a blank on what seedling this could be, but it sounds wonderful.

Katanya Watermelon: I wonder what this watermelon looks and tastes like? I hope it’s sweet and juicy.

Lemon Basil, Mrs Burns: This lady knew her basil; such a tasty spice in certain dishes. Is this basil lemony tasting? 

Morning Glory, Grandpa Ott’s: I believe this is a beautiful flower; I’m thinking of the song line, “What’s the story morning glory.”

Native American Po’suwaegeh Blue Corn Seed: Blue corn would be great,steamed or BBQ’d; then you can put butter and salt on it. Yum! 

Old Virginia Tomatos: Again, more tomato varieties?

Petunia, Old Fashioned Vining: They are such a pretty flower and petunias on vines, how lovely.

Quinoa, Cherry Vanilla:  I see you’re trying to make quinoa seem tasty; I hate it and Cherrry Vanilla makes it sound  grosser! 

Rosita Egg Plant: I would try this, only a bit.

Sorghum, Black Amber Cane:  1/4 lb, sugarcane I think. Love it, they make sugar from it! 

Toothache Plant: I think I’ll keep my distance.

Umbrian Cicerchia: Is it some kind of spice or maybe beans?

Vietnamese Mint or Balm: Mint is incredibly refreshing! Kills bugs around the baseboards too essential mint oil mixed in water.

Xiaohulu Gord: I’m pretty positive you cannot eat this kind of gourd.

Yarrow: What is yarrow?

Zuni gold bean: These beans sound delicious steamed with a bit of becel.

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©Mandibelle16.(2016) All Rights Reserved