Animals/Pets, Fiction, Interviews, My Thoughts, Nature, Nonfiction, Photography/Visual Art, Poetry, Writing

‘Rewind Interview’ with Writer, Blogger, & Poet Ryan Stone #amwriting #interview #nonfiction #poetry


Welcome to another ‘Rewind Interview =” in my now weekly interview series. Ryan is a talented Australian poet, extremely amazing, so I’m excited to reshare his interview with you both on my own blog and now on the Go Dog Go Cafe. The Cafe is a writer’s hangout and you can even submit your work there for publication. Here is the link to do that here: Go Dog Go Cage Contact Page.

Originally, I was doing this as a bi-weekly feature, only on my own blog. So in order to do this as a weekly feature on both my blog and on the Cafe, I’m going to be sharing some ‘Rewind interviews” as I think these writers are equally due recognition on both sites. Just to mention, since this is a ‘Rewind Interview’ some of the info might not be current.

Today, I’m excited and pleased to share with you the talented writer, poet, and blogger Ryan Stone of ‘Days of Stone’. Please visit the link provided to read more about Ryan and read his superb poetry.


Ryan Stone Image
Ryan Stone

1. Please Tell Us About Yourself? 

The blood of the Irish runs deep in my veins but I’m an Australian born and bred. I was raised in a ‘man’s land’ of karate, fast motorbikesheavy metal guitars, and football with Aussie rules.

My love of reading and writing was not readily accepted. Instead, I was forced to indulge my interests under my bed covers by torchlight. But the poets Seamus Heaney, Kenneth SlessorWalt Whitman, and Maya Angelou  — all have a way of asserting themselves in my writing.

Although I have no real love of uniforms, I’ve worn a few in my life so far: the combat fatigues of a soldier in the field and driving a battle tank; the torn black denim of a metal guitarist; and the turnout gear of a firefighter. I’ve been a rank-and-file cop, a detective, and a member of a plainclothes special duties team. When all the uniforms are stripped off, I like to think it is the writer who remains.

I have no formal credentials, only an observer’s eye and an insatiable appetite for books. I’m rough around the edges, but the right turn of phrase will stop me dead in my tracks every time. I love MetallicaTed Kooser, and with equal passion, my closest friend in the world, my German Shepherd (don’t tell my wife).


 “When all the uniforms are stripped off, I like to think it is the writer who remains . . . the right turn of a phrase will stop me dead in my tracks every time.” – Ryan Stone 


 2.  When Did You Begin Writing and Blogging?

The first time I considered my writing to be writing, was towards the end of high school. I was blessed with an incredibly passionate English teacher who managed to channel a teenage boy’s angst and anger into something less destructive. When one of my poems earned me a kiss from a pretty girl I had a crush on, I knew writing was something I’d stick with.

I’ve never been much of a social media fan. But I reached a point where I became sick of waiting several months for editors to respond to my poetry submissions; I turned instead to WordPress. Along with all the great writing and posts, I’m able to read from other writers.

However, I’ve developed a wonderful, supportive group of friends, and readers, who offer feedback and advice in a much shorter time frame than editors. While I still submit to poetry journals, my year of blogging has given me a huge amount of enjoyment and satisfaction.


 3. What Does Poetry Mean To You? Why Do You Write?

To borrow from my favorite quote by Anton Chekhov: Poetry isn’t being told the moon is shining – for me, it is being shown the glint of light on broken glass.

I love the way a poem can capture more than a photograph, can carry an image or emotion over time and space, and let me experience someone else’s worldview for a moment. I also like the way reading one of my own poems years after it was written can transport me back to a previous ‘headspace,’ for a moment.


” . . .Poetry isn’t being told the moon is shining – for me, it is being shown the glint of light on broken glass.” – Ryan Stone (borrowing from Anton Chekhov)


4. Where Do You Find Your Inspiration and Motivation To Write?

Nearly all of my poetry begins while I’m running with my dog through the rain forest beside my house. Usually, a thought, a memory, or an observation takes root and nags at me until I jot it down. Sometimes, an unusual word or phrase will catch me the same way.

My dog has developed his very own here we go again’ face which he pulls each time I pause during a run so I can tap out a note or two on my phone.


 5. Do You Find There Is a Time of Day You Most Like To Write?

Predominantly, I write at night, when my boys are asleep, and the house is quiet. I am frequently awake into the small hours of the morning and find my 2:00 am mind is quite adept at slipping out of the shackles my daytime mind imposes. During these hours, I can most effectively explore and develop the notes I jot down during the day.


Writing Night Ryan Stone
Credit: Andrew Neel via UnSplash 

” I am frequently awake in the small hours of the morning and find my 2:00 am mind is quite adept at slipping out of the shackles my daytime mind imposes.” – Ryan  Stone


6. What Are Your Most Current Writing Projects? 

I have two fantasy novels I’m working on at present. One is about a princess who becomes a pirate queen after her parents are murdered, the other is about an orphan boy who becomes a magician and later, a king.

Both novels began as short stories which expanded and grew during a couple of National Novel Writing Months (NaNoWriMo).  As well, both novels are over hundred-thousand words and in need of serious revision. As with everything, time is a killer.

Poetry wise, I’m writing a chapbook with one of my closest internet mates (Ajay) who lives in India. It is loosely based on flowers and cultural differences. I’m currently editing a collection of my Senryu (5-7-5) poems, with the intention of self-publishing a small e-book of one-hundred Senryu poems, in the next few months, unless a publisher comes along sooner.


 7. Have You Published Any Writing or Are You Planning To Publish Works Of Writing In The Future?

I’m fortunate enough to have had many poems published in a number of online journalsprint anthologies, and poetry magazines. I never thought anyone other than my mum would enjoy my writing and rarely submitted my writing anywhere until recently.

A few years ago, I wrote a poem called “Unburied Hatchet,” which I thought had a chance of being published, so I submitted it to a couple of places and was rejected each time. On a whim, I sent it into the monthly competition in Writers’ Forum Magazine (a magazine in the UK to which I subscribe).

I was blown away when my poem won first prize and £100 (quite a lot of money with the Australian exchange rate being what it is). That first win gave my confidence a much-needed boost and I’ve been submitting ever since.


“I wrote a poem called “Unburied Hatchet” . . .I sent it into the monthly competition in Writers’ Forum Magazine . . .and was blown away when it won first prize and £100.” – Ryan Stone


8. Can You Briefly Describe The Process You Went Through To Publish or Are Going Through To Have Your Writing Published?

All my publishing to date has been by submission, so I’ll talk about publishing by submission. Whether it’s a print journal, online review, magazine, blog, or something else, the rules are always the same:

  • Read the publication first, to gain an idea of what style of writing they publish. While it doesn’t hurt to offer something fresh, I usually have a fair idea of an editor’s likes and dislikes before I submit.
  •  Read and re-read the submission guidelines before you hit sendAn improperly worded subject line can be enough for an editor to discount the submission without even reading the poem. Some publications request everything in the body of an email, others prefer attachments. Decent editors are inundated with submissions which meet their specific requirements and most, won’t waste their time with substandard submissions.
  • Take rejections gracefully. Analyze any critiques subjectively and apply critiques if you think they are warranted. BUT DON’T GIVE UP – submit, submit, submit. There are a million homes for poems out there and because a poem isn’t right for one editor or magazine certainly doesn’t mean it won’t be a prize winner for another editor or magazine. While I’m realistic about my own writing, I generally look at rejections as a case of a bad fitnot a bad poem.

 


 

 9. What Is Your Writing Process Like?

Almost exclusively, my writing begins as a note or two on my iPhone (often while I’m running) and later develops on my iPad. My writing environment is incredibly vital to me and the Mac/iPad writing program — Ulysses — puts me in an excellent creative ‘headspace.’ I tend to write the first draft quickly once idea forms and then I’ll put it aside for a week or two, before returning and revising a poem over and over and over…

I am incredibly fortunate to have found a brilliant first reader. She’s an amazingly talented poet in her own right as well as possessing editing skills second to none. For some reason, I’ve yet to understand, she seems to enjoy my writing and conversation and has nurtured and developed my poetry to no end. My first reader’s input is a huge part of my process in developing a poem from initial idea to finished piece.


“I tend to write a first draft quickly once an idea forms and then I’ll put it aside for a week or two, before returning and revising a poem over and over and over . . .” – Ryan Stone


10. Do You Prefer Certain areas of Writing or Reading Styles or Genres?

When I’m reading a novel, it is usually fantasy and almost always a seriesStephen King’s Dark Tower collection is a favorite, as are Game of ThronesMagicianThe BelgariadLord of the Rings, and Bernard Cornwell’s Arthurian books.

I also play a great deal of electric guitar which draws me to music biographies as well, anything rock or metal is fair game. Additionally, I love short story collections: Italo Calvino takes first prize there, and I read as much modern poetry as I can get my hands on.

Originally, my love of poetry was nurtured by Maya AngelouKenneth SlessorJim Morrison (The Doors), and Jewel Kilcher. When I first discovered Ted Kooser a few years ago, my own poetry made a huge leap.

Kooser’s book, The Poetry Home Repair Manual, was full of ‘Aha!’ moments for me. Most recently, I’ve lost myself in the brilliant Buddy Wakefield and Richard Hugo’s: The Triggering Town.


 11. Do You Have Any Helpful Advice For Other Writers?
 

I’m not really big on dishing out advice, as everyone writes uniquely. What works for one person, won’t always help another person; but I can certainly share what works for me.

  • The important thing is to write, write, write and keep writing. It doesn’t have to be good. I have loads of writing which will probably never see the light of day; however, once the first jumble is out of my head, the writing that follows is much better.
  •  I don’t edit my first draft as I write. I write it all down and worry about cleaning it up later. If I’m only editing a word or two, then I’ll delete and replace. If I’m editing a whole line or large section, I cut and paste in a new version – v1, v2, v3, (etc .) and keep each version in the same document. I find it’s much easier to revise without the fear of losing words or ideas I may want to later reinstate.
  •  Once I’m happy with a version of my work, I put it aside for a few days and return to it later with ‘fresh eyes.’ I find it much easier to spot weak pointssticky spotsdoubled up words, bad rhythm, (etc.) when I’m reading it fresh.
  • The poem is more important than the truth. When I’m writing a poem based on an actual event, I find it easy to place value on a thing because its memory is significant to me. Often, I don’t want to let the thing go from the poem. This can become a weak point as the particular thing doesn’t make the poem better and doesn’t hold the same value for the reader. Once I let the poem dictate what to keep and what to cut, rather than trying to stay one-hundred-percent true to my memory, my poetry comes together far tighter.

“Once I let the poem dictate what to keep and what to cut, rather than trying to stay one-hundred-percent true to my memory, my poetry comes together far tighter.” – Ryan Stone


12. Is There Anything Else You Would Like The Share With Us Which You Think Is Pertinent To Writing or Yourself?

An honest first reader who will tell me what works and what sucks without worrying about my feelings is worth her weight in gold.


 13. Can You Please Share With Us Few Links Of Your Favourite or Most Loved Pieces?  
*****
“Unburied Hatchet”
by
Ryan Stone
*****
Axe
Credit Markus Spiske via UnSplash
*****

Until I saw those wasted hands,

brittle as chalk, I hadn’t thought

how fast the years make ghosts.

*****

I heard them once called brawler’s paws.

For me, they were always more:

cobras, poised to strike.

*****

But his brawling days are gone now;

I could kill him with a pillow,

if I cared enough to try.

*****

Thin sheets press tightly to a bed

more empty than full, his body broken

like the promises of childhood.

*****

Haunted eyes betray last thoughts

of a dim path, spiraling down.

He hopes to make amends.

*****

“Forgiven?” he croaks,

barely there, as always,

and I’m wishing that I wasn’t.

*****

With the last rays of day as witness,

I turn my back with purpose

and hear the silence roar.

*****

In a late-night bar, I catch my reflection

swimming in a glass of bourbon;

but I’m staring at a ghost.

*****

First published in Writers’ Forum Magazine issue 163, April 2015 – first place

 


Please Find More Links to Ryan’s Writing Below:


Thank you so much to Ryan Stone for doing an interview for me. I appreciate his time answering the interview questions a great deal. I would love to interview you too. Please let me know if you’re interested in sharing yourself and your writing on my blog. You can reach me on my Contact Page.


©Mandibelle16. (2017) All Rights Reserved.

Children/YA/Family, Fiction, Lune - 5,3,5 or 5 words, 3 words, 5 words, Memories/Childhood, My Thoughts, Nature, Poetry, Relationship, Travel, Writing, Writing Challenges

Three Line Tales: Poem – Lune – “Memories Endurance” #amwriting #poetry #3LineTales


Thanks to Sonya of Only 100 Words for hosting #3LineTales.

——-

Credit: Meghan Yabsley via UnSplash

——–

Remember, we used to bike, 

Far out towards, 

Soft blue-green temperate ocean tides. 

——-

Miles down the highway to —

Meet dawns arrival, 

Sunlight glazing higher and higher,

——

Until fresh morning air greeted,

Breathing in salt; 

The fragrence of memories endurance. 

—-

©Mandibelle16. (2017) All Rights Reserved. 

Animals/Pets, Interviews, My Thoughts, Nonfiction, Religion/Morality

Interview with LeeAnn – Animal Enthusiast


Welcome back to my biweekly interview series. Today I’m interviewing Lee Ann from the blogAnimals Are Feeling Beings Too. As LeeAnn’s blog focus is more on helping animals through her blog, the focus of this interview will be slightly different than past interviews.


interview-animals
Credit: LeeAnn – http://www.animalsarefeelingbeingstoo.com

1. LeeAnne, Please Tell Us About Yourself and Your Blog? 

I have always been a quiet, deep-thinking, and observational person.Through deep-thinking and my tendency to observe, I noticed a lot of aspects about animals. Watching them, and paying attention to them, I fell in love with them.

As I am a quiet person, I feel I tend to get lost in the crowd much of the time. I noticed a similar thing often occurred with animals; they were getting lost in the crowd too when people didn’t pay attention and take care of them. Intrinsically, I felt their worth, their needs,  and I noticed the way some of them were not treated nicely. My passion for helping animals was born.


2. When Did You Begin Blogging ? What Does Writing and Blogging Mean to You?

I had taken classes for Web Design in 2013 and one of the assignments was to create a blog. My blog was my current blog: Animals Are Feeling Beings Too and I wrote on it occasionally over the next few years. However, in August 2016 I started blogging regularly. I have had different experiences with writing throughout my life.

Back in elementary school I first fell in love with poetry and writing (and my poetry teacher J). Since then, I have written several poems over the years, but only for my family and friends for special occasions such as weddings, graduations, and other special events. Currently, some of my responsibilities at work include writing newsletters and social media posts.

Blogging means everything to me because of what I write about. I adore animals and feel passionate about helping them. I have been trying to figure out my entire life how to utilize my love for animals. When the assignment came up in my course to create a blog, my teacher told me she thought I should continue with my ‘helping animal’ themed blog.

I guess you could say a light bulb went off in my head. It took me a few years to apply myself, consistently blogging. But I think I had troubles because I was burnt out from being on a computer all day between work and school. I write because I want to help animals by spreading the word about animals who are abused, the worth of animals, and our responsibility to care for them.


”  I write because I want to help animals by spreading the word about animals who are abused, the worth of animals, and our responsibility to care for them.” – LeeAnn


3. Where Do You Find Your Motivation and Inspiration to Write? Is There A Time Of Day You Prefer To Write?

Unfortunately, there are way too many people out there harming animals and not enough laws to protect the animals. This is where my inspiration and motivation comes from. I want to make a difference and ensure fewer animals are harmed. I also feel a lot of people are unaware of how much animal abuse exists and how few laws there are to protect animals (pets).I am hoping to bring light to these issues on my blog.

I am more alert and ‘fresh’ in the late morning after I have some coffee; however, because I have a full-time job, a lot of my writing and blog posts are done in the evening after work.


interview-animals2
Credit: http://www.animalsarefeelingbeingstoo.com – LeeAnne’s Cat Cino

4. Do You Have Any Current Pet-Related Writing Projects or Hopeful Ones? Are You Planning on Publishing Anything Related to Animals?

My blog is my current and ongoing project. I am only six months into regular blogging, so I am still new at blogging. I am working hard at ‘getting my writing out there’ on animal issues. My hope is to grow my traffic, not for my sake, but for the sake of animals and to make a difference.

So far, I’ve not published anything other than blog posts. I have considered writing a children’s book on empathy towards animals someday. I believe since children are our future, teaching them to be considerate towards animals could make a huge difference on the way animals in the in years to come will be treated by their owners (etc.) I may also turn some of my blog posts into a book someday.


” I believe since children are our future, teaching them to be considerate towards animals could make a huge difference on the way animals in the in years to come will be treated by their owners (etc).” – LeeAnn


5. What Is Your Writing Process Like When Focusing on Animals?

As I mentioned, there is so much animal abuse going on, so there is not a lack of topics to write about. If I see a story on the web about an animal that was abused, I start thinking and the writing process for a post begins.

For example, after going to the Renaissance Festival I noticed an elephant chained to a contraption which only allowed him to move around in a circle giving people rides. I started thinking and when I was home, I wrote about this event and how awful it was for the poor elephant to be so confined and probably abused.


6. Do You Have Any Advice For Other Bloggers or on Advice on How People Can Help Animals in Need?

I am not a  ‘professional’ writer, but as another blogger said: “If you’re writing on a blog, you are a writer.” Writing and blogging are skills I and other writers improve on with time. I am still learning and growing as I learn more about blogging, particularly for my significant cause. As well on my blog’s About Page I wrote this about how people can aid animals:


“Supporting animal organizations is . . . one way I help animals . . . I write about a wide variety of topics and types of animals, and I usually share links so you can check out the organization/topic being discussed.

There are many ways we can all help animals. Donating items to shelters, writing letters, signing petitions, volunteering time at an animal organization, sharing my posts to spread the word, and much more.” – LeeAnn


7. Do You Have Anything Else You’d Like To Share With Readers on Helping Animals, Yourself, or Blogging?

I am attempting to give my blog real purpose (a means to an end) that my writing and blogging actually result in animals at risk or already being harmed, not being hurt anymore. I also want people to know  I do have a large variety of posts on my blog.

Some of the posts I write include Pet Tales, Vegetarian Recipes, Pet Care Tips, and Serious Topics such as Animal Abuse Issues. I also use pictures from other bloggers and Facebook Page followers. I post them in my posts called ‘Tuesday Tales.’


8. Do You Have Any Favorite Bloggers You Follow?

I enjoy different kinds of blogs, but I think my favorite blogs are when someone writes about their pet(s). I think it’s fun to see all those adorable pet photos and learn about various animals and their personalities. Oddly enough, I do not necessarily like to follow blogs that are about ‘animal activism.’ I applaud them but I find these blogs usually too graphic for me to handle.


9. Please Share With Us Some of Your Animal Related Blog Posts:

The post below was written when a young follower of mine contacted me to let me know she was inspired by my blog. She wrote a poem called “Animals Are Feeling beings Too” which she published on her blog.


Hoping to Make an Impact

By LeeAnn

November 17, 2016

I have been blogging (well…serious blogging) for a few months now. I have played around with my blog, changing & adding things like the “Tuesday Tales” where I share animal stories and “Sunday Pause (Paws)” where I encourage everyone to kick back & relax. On my “Vegetarian Challenge” page I try to add recipes every now & then. There hasn’t been an actual challenge yet, but maybe in the future. Also, I have been adding my favorite cruelty-free products to the “Links” page, adding some pictures of my cat, Cino and “Pet Care Tips.”

I will continue to add to these pages and keep a variety on my blog. But one thing that will not change is where my heart is, and that is helping the fight against animal cruelty.

This means some of my posts will not be so uplifting or fun. If I were to only do “happy” posts I wouldn’t be spreading the word about animal cruelty and therefore I wouldn’t be helping animals.

do-somethingYouTube

Something I saw on Facebook (or somewhere) not so long ago was this sentence, “The reason I dedicate myself to helping animals so much is because there are already so many people who dedicate their lives to hurting them.” Sadly, a true statement!

There are a lot of people who tell me they can’t stand to read or see anything about animal abuse because it bothers them too much. It bothers me A LOT too, but I can not turn my back on them. I want to encourage others not to either.

I recently have received a few great compliments from fellow bloggers about my blog. This makes me feel so warm & fuzzy. I also received a message from a young follower, named Leona, that said me and my blog inspire her, and that she wrote a poem and named it “Animals Are Feeling Beings Too.” I was overjoyed by this! It makes me think maybe I AM making an impact out there for the good of animals!

I-am-important-to-animalsQuotesgram

Please read the magnificent poem here written by 12-year-old Leona.

Great job Leona! Keep writing and spreading the word about animals! Thank you for the awesome poem and sharing it with me!


9. Here Are Some Additional Posts By LeeAnn:

The following three posts are on serious topics that were my most  ‘Liked’  and ‘Shared. They have extremely important messages within them. 

The post below is one of my most ‘Liked’ posts from my ‘Tuesday Tales’ page where I share pet stories from the web and from other bloggers and Facebook followers.

Lastly, this post below is an adorable pet photo compilation from other bloggers and Facebook followers from over the holidays.


Thanks to LeeAnn for the lovely interview and sharing her passion for taking care of and helping animals at home and ones who are in need. Best of luck to her in her blog and spreading the word about animal empathy and the proper way to treat your pets and animals in general. Here is a Link To LeeAnn’s blog one last time: Animals Are Feeling Beings Too.


If you would like to share your blogging or writing in my biweekly interview series, please reach out to me through my contact page on my blog. I will see you in two weeks!


©Mandibelle16. (2017) All Rights Reserved.

 

 

 

My Thoughts

Poem: Free Verse – “Young and Beautiful” #music #poetry #amwriting 


Credit: Chemo Madoz – http://www.pinterest.com

——

“Young and Beautiful” – Lana Del Rey 

——-

Such a wish have humans, 

For the fountain of youth. 

Retaining our vivacity, 
Twenty-something good-looks. 

To maintain an image of fresh faces, 

Yet carry the wisdom age gains. 

I think if we knew anything, 

We’d know it’s a curse to be young forever. 

For all such wisdom acquired in life, 

There’s a price to be paid. 

Experience taught and it —

Marked us with age spots, 

With wrinkles and scars, 

With under eye circles, 

Nightmares and inner trauma. 

Journeying through life we learned

 Our lesson, or perhaps we haven’t yet? 

When we are young, 

We are carefree and full of vigor. 

Not thoughtful in how we think or react,

No maturity, no flash of pain;

The liberty of youth suits the young. 

But to be a man or woman-child with —

The eyes of our great-grandparents,

Bearing several lifetimes of burdens;

I think, for a mere human, 

Would be too much grief to bear. 

For the older we become, 

We learn from birth we’re dying. 

Life is a quest and it’s meant to end

We’re meant for the heavens, 

Free of our lifetime of issues

Emotional, psychological, and physical decay, 

The exhaustion of life. 

The old realize when their time is coming —

That it is right. 

A lifetime of sorrows, to have so many years,

Would break a soul completely;

Nevermind a physical body. 

That’s why the young are beautiful,

Life hasn’t wounded them. 

They are too ignorant to see — 

Life isn’t meant on earth to be eternity —

The light shining to restore body, soul, and mind, 

In heaven shines for all,  

In timelessness we will be young,

All of us appearing how we ought;

No imperfections, 

Perfect creations.

Handling both knowledge and beauty,

Eloquent and graceful;

Gods children thankful

And only those who die young,

When life is torn by accident

By atrocity and ill health, 

(And the aged)

Understand this concept. 

As their grandparents did or do, 

Only the ill and dying, have vantage of this, 

Life is so frail;

A wisp of a veil torn, 

We’re all too busy living to see. 

——

©Mandibelle16. (2016) All Rights Reserved. 

Interviews, Nonfiction, Poetry, Quotes, Short Stories And Serial Stories, Writing

Interview with Ryan Stone


Welcome to another interview in my interview series. Originally, I was going to make this a monthly feature, but I had a great response from other bloggers and writers who wish to be interviewed, so I will try it as a series which occurs every two-weeks.
Today, I’m excited and pleased to share with you the talented writer and blogger Ryan Stone of ‘Days of Stone’. Please visit the link provided to read more about Ryan and read his superb poetry.

Ryan Stone Image
Ryan Stone

1. Please Tell Us About Yourself.
The blood of the Irish runs deep in my veins but I’m an Australian born and bred. I was raised in a ‘man’s land’ of karate, fast motorbikes, heavy metal guitars, and football with Aussie rules. My love of reading and writing was not readily accepted. Instead, I was forced to indulge my interests under my bed covers by torchlight. But the poets Seamus Heaney, Kenneth Slessor, Walt Whitman, and Maya Angelou  — all have a way of asserting themselves in my writing.
Although I have no real love of uniforms, I’ve worn a few in my life so far: the combat fatigues of a soldier in the field and driving a battle tank; the torn black denim of a metal guitarist; and the turnout gear of a fire-fighter. I’ve been a rank-and-file cop, a detective, and a member of a plain-clothes special duties team. When all the uniforms are stripped off, I like to think it is the writer who remains.
I have no formal credentials, only an observer’s eye and an insatiable appetite for books. I’m rough around the edges, but the right turn of phrase will stop me dead in my tracks every time. I love MetallicaTed Kooser, and with equal passion, my closest friend in the world, my German Shepherd (don’t tell my wife).

 “When all the uniforms are stripped off, I like to think it is the writer who remains . . . the right turn of a phrase will stop me dead in my tracks every time.” – Ryan Stone 

 2.  When Did You Begin Writing and Blogging?
The first time I considered my writing to be writing, was towards the end of high school. I was blessed with an incredibly passionate English teacher who managed to channel a teenage boy’s angst and anger into something less destructive. When one of my poems earned me a kiss from a pretty girl I had a crush on, I knew writing was something I’d stick with.
I’ve never been much of a social media fan. But I reached a point where I became sick of waiting several months for editors to respond to my poetry submissions; I turned instead to WordPress. Along with all the great writing and posts I’m able to read from other writers, I’ve developed a wonderful, supportive group of friends, and readers, who offer feedback and advice in a much shorter time frame than editors. While I still submit to poetry journals, my year of blogging has given me a huge amount of enjoyment and satisfaction.

 3. What Does Poetry Mean To You? Why Do You Write?
To borrow from my favourite quote by Anton Chekhov: Poetry isn’t being told the moon is shining – for me, it is being shown the glint of light on broken glass.
 
I love the way a poem can capture more than a photograph, can carry an image or emotion over time and space, and let me experience someone else’s worldview for a moment. I also like the way reading one of my own poems years after it was written can transport me back to a previous ‘headspace,’ for a moment.

” . . .Poetry isn’t being told the moon is shining – for me, it is being shown the glint of light on broken glass.” – Ryan Stone (borrowing from Anton Chekhov)

4. Where Do You Find Your Inspiration and Motivation To Write?
Nearly all of my poetry begins while I’m running with my dog through the rain forest beside my house. Usually, a thought, a memory, or an observation takes root and nags at me until I jot it down. Sometimes, an unusual word or phrase will catch me the same way. My dog has developed his very own here we go again’ face which he pulls each time I pause during a run, so I can tap out a note or two on my phone.

 5. Do You Find There Is a Time of Day You Most Like To Write?
Predominantly, I write at night, when my boys are asleep, and the house is quiet. I am frequently awake into the small hours of the morning and find my 2:00 am mind is quite adept at slipping out of the shackles my daytime mind imposes. During these hours, I can most effectively explore and develop the notes I jot down during the day.

” I am frequently awake in the small hours of the morning and find my 2:00 am mind is quite adept at slipping out of the shackles my daytime mind imposes.” – Ryan  Stone

6. What Are Your Most Current Writing Projects? 
I have two fantasy novels I’m working on at present. One is about a princess who becomes a pirate queen after her parents are murdered, the other is about an orphan boy who becomes a magician and later, a king. Both novels began as short stories which expanded and grew during a couple of National Novel Writing Months (NaNoWriMo). Both novels are over a hundred-thousand words and in need of serious revision. As with everything, time is a killer.
Poetry wise, I’m writing a chapbook with one of my closest internet mates (Ajay) who lives in India. It is loosely based around flowers and cultural differences. I’m currently editing a collection of my Senryu (5-7-5) poems, with the intention of self-publishing a small e-book of one-hundred Senryu poems, in the next few months…unless a publisher comes along sooner.

 7. Have You Published Any Writing or Are You Planning To Publish Works Of Writing In The Future?
I’m fortunate enough to have had many poems published in a number of online journals, print anthologies, and poetry magazines. I never thought anyone other than my mum would enjoy my writing and rarely submitted my writing anywhere until recently.
A few years ago, I wrote a poem called “Unburied Hatchet,” which I thought had a chance of being published, so I submitted it to a couple of places…and was rejected each time. On a whim, I sent it into the monthly competition in Writers’ Forum Magazine (a magazine in the UK to which I subscribe), and was blown away when it won first prize and £100 (quite a lot of money with the Australian exchange rate being what it is). That first win, gave my confidence a much-needed boost and I’ve been submitting ever since.

” I wrote a poem called “Unburied Hatchet” . . .I sent it into the monthly competition in Writers’ Forum Magazine . . .and was blown away when it won first prize and £100.” – Ryan Stone

8. Can You Briefly Describe The Process You Went Through To Publish or Are Going Through To Have Your Writing Published?
 
All my publishing to date has been by submission, so I’ll talk about publishing by submission. Whether it’s a print journal, online review, magazine, blog, or something else, the rules are always the same.
  • Read the publication first, to gain an idea of what style of writing they publish. While it doesn’t hurt to offer something fresh, I usually have a fair idea of an editor’s likes and dislikes before I submit.

 

  •  Read and re-read the submission guidelines before you hit sendAn improperly worded subject line can be enough for an editor to discount the submission without even reading the poem. Some publications request everything in the body of an email, others prefer attachments. Decent editors are inundated with submissions which meet their specific requirements and most, won’t waste their time with sub-standard submissions.

 

  • Take rejections gracefully. Analyze any critiques subjectively and apply critiques if you think they are warranted. BUT DON’T GIVE UP – submit, submit, submit. There are a million homes for poems out there and because a poem isn’t right for one editor or magazine certainly doesn’t mean it won’t be a prize winner for another editor or magazine. While I’m realistic about my own writing, I generally look at rejections as a case of a bad fit, not a bad poem.

 9. What Is Your Writing Process Like?
Almost exclusively, my writing begins as a note or two on my iPhone (often while I’m running) and later develops on my iPad. My writing environment is incredibly vital to me and the Mac/iPad writing program — Ulysses — puts me in an excellent creative ‘headspace.’ I tend to write a first draft quickly once an idea forms and then I’ll put it aside for a week or two, before returning and revising a poem over and over and over…
I am incredibly fortunate to have found a brilliant first reader. She’s an amazingly talented poet in her own right as well as possessing editing skills second to none. For some reason, I’ve yet to understand, she seems to enjoy my writing and conversation and has nurtured and developed my poetry to no end. My first reader’s input is a huge part of my process in developing a poem from initial idea to finished piece.

” I tend to write a first draft quickly once an idea forms and then I’ll put it aside for a week or two, before returning and revising a poem over and over and over . . .” – Ryan Stone

10. Do You Prefer Certain areas of Writing or Reading Styles or Genres?
When I’m reading a novel, it is usually fantasy and almost always a series. Stephen King’s Dark Tower collection is a favourite, as are Game of Thrones, Magician, The Belgariad, Lord of the Rings, and Bernard Cornwell’s Arthurian books.  I play a great deal of electric guitar which draws me to music biographies as well, anything rock or metal is fair game. Additionally, I love short story collections: Italo Calvino takes first prize there, and I read as much modern poetry as I can get my hands on.
Originally, my love of poetry was nurtured by Maya Angelou, Kenneth Slessor, Jim Morrison (The Doors), and Jewel Kilcher. When I first discovered Ted Kooser a few years ago, my own poetry made a huge leap. Kooser’s book, The Poetry Home Repair Manual, was full of ‘Aha!’ moments for me. Most recently, I’ve lost myself in the brilliant Buddy Wakefield and Richard Hugo’s: The Triggering Town.

 11. Do You Have Any Helpful Advice For Other Writers?
I’m not really big on dishing out advice, as everyone writes uniquely. What works for one person, won’t always help another person; but I can certainly share what works for me.
  •  The important thing is to write, write, write and keep writing. It doesn’t have to be good. I have loads of writing which will probably never see the light of day; however, once the first jumble is out of my head, the writing that follows is  much better.

 

  •  I don’t edit my first draft as I write. I write it all down and worry about cleaning it up later. If I’m only editing a word or two, then I’ll delete and replace. If I’m editing a whole line or large section, I cut and paste in a new version – v1, v2, v3, (etc .) and keep each version in the same document. I find it’s much easier to revise without the fear of losing words or ideas I may want to later reinstate.

 

  •  Once I’m happy with a version of my work, I put it aside for a few days and return to it later with ‘fresh eyes.’ I find it much easier to spot weak points, sticky spots, doubled up words, bad rhythm, (etc.), when I’m reading it fresh.

 

  • The poem is more important than the truth. When I’m writing a poem based on an actual event, I find it easy to place value on a thing because its memory is significant to me. Often, I don’t want to let the thing go from the poem. This can become a weak point as the particular thing doesn’t make the poem better and doesn’t hold the same value for the reader. Once I let the poem dictate what to keep and what to cut, rather than trying to stay one-hundred-percent true to my memory, my poetry comes together far tighter.

“Once I let the poem dictate what to keep and what to cut, rather than trying to stay one-hundred-percent true to my memory, my poetry comes together far tighter.” – Ryan Stone


12. Is There Anything Else You Would Like The Share With Us Which You Think Is Pertinent To Writing or Yourself?
An honest first reader who will tell me what works and what sucks without worrying about my feelings, is worth her weight in gold.

 13. Can You Please Share With Us Few Links Of Your Favourite or Most Loved Pieces?  
“Unburied Hatchet”
Until I saw those wasted hands,
brittle as chalk, I hadn’t thought
how fast the years make ghosts.
I heard them once called brawler’s paws.
For me, they were always more:
cobras, poised to strike.
But his brawling days are gone now;
I could kill him with a pillow,
if I cared enough to try.
Thin sheets press tightly to a bed
more empty than full, his body broken
like the promises of childhood.
Haunted eyes betray last thoughts
of a dim path, spiralling down.
He hopes to make amends.
“Forgiven?” he croaks,
barely there, as always,
and I’m wishing that I wasn’t.
With the last rays of day as witness,
I turn my back with purpose
and hear the silence roar.
In a late-night bar I catch my reflection
swimming in a glass of bourbon;
but I’m staring at a ghost.
– Ryan Stone
First published in Writers’ Forum Magazine issue 163, April 2015 – first place

Please Find More Links to Ryan’s Writing Below:


Thank you so much to Ryan Stone for doing an interview for me. I appreciate his time answering the interview questions a great deal.

I would love to interview you too. Please let me know if you’re interested in sharing yourself and your writing on my blog. You can reach me on my Contact Page.


©Mandibelle16. (2016) All Rights Reserved.

Beauty, Health, My Thoughts, Nonfiction, Writing

Beauty Haul – Part 2 – June 2016


This is the second part of my beauty haul from February to the present month of June. Part 1 was only on products used on the eyes and can be found here.

For this post, I will only be focusing on makeup and products used on your face, excluding your eyes. As per usual, I buy my makeup from a variety of stores including The Bay, Sephora, and Shoppers Drug Mart online, but I will be searching for the items and providing you links to Sephora whenever I can because they carry the majority of the products I buy.


1. NARS blush in Orgasm – (www.sephora.ca) – $38.00 CAN – This blush is one of my all

Beauty - NARS Blush in Orgasm
NARS blush Orgasm (www.sephora.ca) $38.00 CAN
time favourite blush colours. Not only mine, but beauty product lovers and makeup artists alike. The color Orgasm is described as a “peachy pink with shimmer.” It is one of the only blush colours which can be worn by anyone, no matter their skin tone. Although, my skin is pale and I often tend towards colours which are pink or purple, this colour is perfect for me as well because of the pink tone in it; however, if you have skin which has more yellow undertones, the peachiness of Orgasm will also appear beautiful on you.

Another aspect I love about NARS blush is that it lasts forever. Yes, $38.00 CAN may seem expensive to spend on one blush, but this blush will last you years and works well with many other makeup colours. I had a smaller container of the Orgasm blush I used up before I repurchased the Orgasm blush, and the smaller container lasted about four-years and I wore it two or three times a week.

As well, with many NARS products, the pigment of Orgasm is fantastic. If you’ve lighter toned skin, I caution you to be careful when you apply NARS blushes, including Orgasm because it is extremely easy to apply too much blush at once; you want your blush to appear like a natural flush. I hope you like this colour and will have a look at Sephora online or in-store, at some of the other colours available in NARS blushes. There are many pretty blush shades all with excellent pigment concentration.

Since the Orgasm colour is so popular for NARS, it is one of ten colours you can buy in a cream to powder blush as well as in the powder form. I have also seen the colour in a luminosity highlighter you can add to your foundation to receive a more dewy appearance in summer time.


2. BENEFIT Girl Meets Pearl – Liquid Pearl for Face – (www.sephora.ca) – $39.00 CAN

I purchased Girl Meets Pearl, a year or two ago. I bought it because I thought it would

MAKEUP - BENEFIT Girl Meets Pearl
BENEFIT – Girl Meets Pearl Highlighter – $39.00 CAN (www.sephora.ca)
be a superb natural highlighter for your cheekbones or brow bones, but the consistency of the highlighter was too liquid and I didn’t achieve the look I was hoping to get.

However, this summer I was searching for a luminizing highlighter which is glowy and shimmery, to add to my matte MAKE UP FOREVER foundation;  it gives more of a summery glow to your makeup. I didn’t want to switch foundations and end up breaking-out or having my skin appear too oily.

I apply Girl Meets Pearl after I apply my foundation. I put a bit of Girl Meets Pearl on the top of my hand and take my foundation brush and blend Girl Meets Pearl into my foundation on my face. The results, are fantastic.

Girl Meets Pearl is the perfect “pearly golden pink” for many skin tones and it lightens the heaviness of a more matte foundation, without making your skin oily. It provides a subtle sheen. I’m extremely happy with this product now and I wasn’t when I bought it originally. But, for mixing with your foundation Girl Meets Pearl is the best highlighter product.

As well, Girl Meets Pearl has chamomile and sweet almond seed extract in it so it improves the appearance of skin’s “firmness” and “smoothness.” I also want to mention, I have tried to use this product on several other occasions, so it has lasted well and I think is good value for your money for this type of highlighter.


3. SEPHORA Radiant Luminizing Drops in Starlight – (www.sephora.ca) – $19.00 CAN

Beauty - SEPHORA - Radiant Luminizing Drops in Starlight
Sephora Luminizing Drops in Starlight – $19.00 CAN – (www.sephora.ca)
This product was supposed to do what the BENEFIT’s Girl Meets Pearl does; however, I didn’t realize I had a product which already worked well as a luminizing highlighter to add to my foundation.

When I was at Sephora, I chose this product which is Sephora’s own makeup brand. I have not tried too much of Sephora’s makeup brand but the price was right and I liked the pink colour of the Luminizing Drops. You can also buy them in Ultra Light – Bronze, or Morning Light – Champagne.

I have tried the Luminizing Drops a few times, but compared to the BENEFIT Girl Meets Pearl, it doesn’t do justice to it’s proclaimed ‘luminizing’ effects. You’re only supposed to put a drop or two of the Luminizing Drops mixed with your foundation. This did nothing for me because you couldn’t tell my skin appeared any different than if I had only worn my foundation alone. Adding more drops helped, but it was difficult to do using the dropper in the Luminizing Drops. It’s difficult to get the product out of the container at all.

Maybe, it’s me? I can be mechanically challenged at times, but I’m not impressed with the dropper Sephora used in this product; it isn’t great. I think in this case, you get what you pay for. I cheaped-out, instead of buying a more expensive NARS Luminizing Highlighter (which I mentioned in the NARS blush review above), in the colour Orgasm.

I didn’t end up needing to buy a luminizer at all, but at least had I bought the NARS luminizer, I would have used it all up. I’m disappointed with the SEPHORA Luminizing Drops.


4. URBAN DECAY – De-Slick Makeup Setting Spray -Oil Free – (www.sephora.ca) – $38.00 CAN (4 0z) or $17.00 (1 oz) Of all the makeup products I have purchased lately,

Beauty - URBAN DECAY - De-Slick Makeup Setting Spray Oil - Control
URBAN DECAY Makeup Setting Spray Oil-Control (4 oz) $39.00 CAN (1 oz) $17.00 CAN (www.sephora.ca)
this one is nearly, the absolute best. I’ve watched many You Tube Makeup Tutorials and many women say using a Makeup Setting Spray so their makeup doesn’t rub off, and stays in place, throughout the day or night helps the duration of their makeup. You can also use the Makeup Setting Spray to keep your skin from appearing oily.

This product is everything it promises to be. It keeps your makeup in place by using a technology which “lowers the temperature of your makeup” so it doesn’t rub-off. One reason I know it stays in place: If I go to take a small afternoon nap, my makeup remains on my face and doesn’t end up all over my white pillow case.

Also, because I want my face to appear ‘glowy’ and ‘luminous’ in the summer, not greasy and oily, the Makeup Setting Spray is exceptional at helping my face not appear as if I’m sweating my makeup off.

I only picked up the 1 oz size on my way to pay for other Sephora products and I have found the product to be a game-changer in my makeup routine.As vital as having the right primer for your makeup can be when you want your makeup to last long, I think the the Makeup Setting Spray is an even better purchase, especially if your skin is oily.

I use the Makeup Setting Spray every day and I don’t break out from it either. If you are searching for a cheaper option, I have seen but not tried, NYC makeup in the drugstore, has their own version of URBAN DECAYS Makeup Setting Spray. If you have tried it, let me know how it works.


5. LIPPYGIRL Vegocentric Lipstick in p-Bomb – (www.lippygirl.com) – $23.00 CAN

Beauty - Lippygirl Vegocentric Lipstick in p-Bomb
LippyGirl Lipstick in p-Bomb -$23.00 – (www.lippygirl.com)
I received this lipstick in a Luxebox a couple of boxes ago. I’m so pleased with the colour and how well it stays on your lips, through out the day. LIPPYGIRL lipsticks make your lips feel extremely soft and smooth after applying it.

P-Bomb is a  glimmery lipstick in a bright pink but the lipstick colour is not a pink so bright it is blinding or too bold for the day time. P-Bomb’s perfect to finish off a subtle makeup look and I love it for summer and every season of the year.

As well, LIPPYGIRL lipstick is Vegocentric. If you’re a Vegan or someone seeking to use makeup which is naturally based, this is a great lipstick and website for you to check-out. 

LIPPYGIRL has many more lipstick shades as well as other makeup products for your eyes, lips, and face. I also get the impression from their website, they’re a Canadian company which I like a great deal. It’s important to support our economy and local businesses in Canada.


6. PHYSICANS FORMULA Palette Mineral Glow Pearls in Translucent – (www.ulta.ca) – $13.99 US I was stoked to find this product in Winners in

Beauty - PHYSCIANS FORMULA Transclucent Highlighter
PHYSICIANS FORMULA Palette Mineral Glow Pearls – $13.99 US – (www.ulta.com)
Canada. It was on sale for about $5.99 so I paid much less than the listed US price. I couldn’t find the product online in Canada but I’m certain if they carry it at ULTA in the US, you can find it at Shoppers Drug Mart here. I usually am pretty careful I don’t buy too cheap of makeup because it has a greater tendency to make me break-out. However, I have used PHYSICIANS FORMULA before and I know it’s a mineral based makeup which is better for your skin. The value for the quality of product is awesome with this drugstore brand.

I bought Mineral Glow Pearls because the highlighter I have at home, is too intense for day time wear. I only need something that is going to give a little glow to my cheek bones, brow bones, the tip of my nose, and cupids bow of my lip. The pigment of the Mineral Glow Pearls is only a touch luminizing when used alone, or to contour your face, for every day makeup at work or wherever. This highlighter appears more natural than my beloved Candle Light Highlighter by TWO FACED. But I prefer the TWO FACED highlighter when I’m going out with the girls or am out at night.

I’m extremely happy with Mineral Glow Pearls and highly recommend the PHYSCIANS FORMULA brand if you want makeup that won’t make you break-out, is mineral, a cheaper price point, and comes in many shades and colours appropriate for various skin tones. I bought the Mineral Glow Pearls in the colour Translucent as I am fair skinned but ULTA also showed the same product available in the colours Beige, Light Bronze, and Bronze.


7. LUSH – Mask of Magnaminty – (www.lush.ca) – (125g) $13.95 – (315g) $25.95

 

Beauty - LUSH Mask of Magnaminty
LUSH Mask of Magnaminty – (125g) $13.95 CAN; (315g) $25.95 (www.lush.ca)
Everyone hates being an adult and still having to deal with acne. For me, my skin is pretty well-behaved except for twice a year when hot weather comes in the summer time and when winter weather comes in the fall. My skin tends to break out worse than it does any other time, once or twice, before becoming used to the change in weather.

I love LUSH products and they have been so helpful in my beauty routine. On the LUSH online website they say Mask of Magnaminty is technically a “daily facial wash” but it’s main purpose is “deep-cleaning” for the face and body.

As we have been experiencing warmer weather, my skin began to break-out, so I started using the Mask of Magnaminty every two-days. It completely calmed my skin down and the breakouts have gone away. When I’m not having any acne at all, I have switched to using the Mask of Magnaminty once a week. But if I have a bit of acne, I will use the mask every two-days until my acne clears. A person could use the Mask of Magnaminty every day, but for me, I find it drys my skin out if I overuse it.

The mask contains “aduki beans” to exfoliate skin, vanilla to “calm redness,” and honey “to smooth.” As well, their is indeed ‘mint’ in the Mask of Magnaminty which I adore because it provides your skin with this clean tingly feeling after you’ve washed off the mask.

Mask of Magnaminty is a wonderful product, as many LUSH products are. I think it will replace my LUSH Chocolate mask, which has been my go-to for breakouts and weekly skin maintenance. I also find this new mask lasts a long time. I have had the product for over a month now, and have used a quarter of the 125g container mostly applying it every two-days.

I wish I had the Mask of Magnaminty when I was in high school; my skin would have been much nicer. If you know any body struggling, this a fantastic mask. I can’t believe how smooth my skin feels after using it. 

Thanks for reading my beauty product reviews!


©Mandibelle16. (2016) All Rights Reserved.

 

 

My Thoughts, Nonfiction, Shakespearean Sonnet - iambic pentameter abab cdcd efef gg, Short Stories And Serial Stories, Writing

NaPoWriMo: Poem – Shakespearen Sonnet – “Guiding Each Other “


And finally, our prompt (optional, as always). Today, I challenge you to write a sonnet. Traditionally, sonnets are 14-line poems, with ten syllables per line, written in iambs (i.e., with a meter in which an unstressed syllable is followed by one stressed syllable, and so on). There are several traditional rhyme schemes, including the Petrarchan, Spenserian, and Shakespearean sonnets. But beyond the strictures of form, sonnets usually pose a question of a sort, explore the ideas raised by the question, and then come to a conclusion. In a way, they are essays written in verse! This means you can write a “sonnet” that doesn’t have meet all of the traditional formal elements, but still functions as a mini-essay of a sort. The main point is to keep your poem tight, not rangy, and to use the shorter confines of the form to fuel the poem’s energy. As Wordsworth put it, in a very formal sonnet indeed, “Nuns fret not at their convent’s narrow room.” Happy writing!

Please see the website for NaPoWriMo for more information. Rhyme scheme is abab, cdcd, efef, gg.

—–

http://www.womensweb.in

—–

Why do we forge ahead in life, no thought,

For others in our path, hindrance to steps,

Walking on people, won’t provide what’s sought.

Pick-up the down trodden, those who have wept,

—–

Provide helping hands, pick other’s up, give —

Show undeserved grace, to the sufferring,

We were there once, desperate, needing to live.

Falling apart at the seems, blustering.

—–

We’re here to aid others as we journey,

Time ticking past until, our lives are over.

Assisting friends, before they’re lost, learning.

Life isn’t ‘us;’ let kindness spillover.

—–

Emerging fresh, considering our steps,

Aiding ourselves, others, placing footsteps.

—–

©Mandibelle16. (2016) All Rights Reserved

NaPoWriMo, Poetry, Writing

Day 2 – NaPoWriMo – Catching Stars


I look above me from the fresh cut grass

And I feel the blackness engulfing me

Oh, but for the light of diamond stars

I reach up high, I cannot touch them

For they are billions of miles away

But maybe I feel I might just graze them with my finger tips

These stars they burn my hands, these giant balls of gas

Burning clear through my memory to that night

When you sat beside me and we were relaxed

You had a sleeping bag spread, just in case

But the grass called to me and you held my hand

The stars torches to the gods of kingdoms past

And we small humans looking up at them

Reflected in our eyes we see what the ancients saw

Something older and wiser then any of us

Queens of the sky majestic in your ball of light

So close, but yet so far

And you held my hand, I was warm and sleepy

The stars in your eyes burning softly

Daily Prompt, Writing

Daily Post Photo – New


I love art and painting. Especially vivid layered paintings where you can see the strokes the brush made of paint and the thickness of the paint used. What really draws me to a painting though is that I’m able to see something new in that painting every time I look at it. I may see a stroke of brown one time, an area that it seems the artist forgot to paint ( or maybe not?) another time, and different shades of grey paint going in various directions another time. Even in the simplest of paintings a person can see a million things and each person will see something different then someone else. For these reasons, paintings are always new and fresh to the beholder’s eye.

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