NaPoWriMo: Poem – Heirloom Seeds – Alaphabet Poem -“Various Seeds Alphabetically”


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And now, our (optional, as always) daily prompt! April is a time for planting things (at least where I am, in Washington DC – you may still be waiting for spring, or well into some other season!) At any rate, I’ve recently been paging through seed catalogs, many of which feature “heirloom” seeds with fabulous names. Consider the “Old Ivory Egg” tomato, the “Ozark Razorback” or “Fast Lady” cow-pea, “Neal’s Paymaster” dent corn, or the “Tongues of Fire” bush bean. Today, I challenge you to spend some time looking at the names of heirloom plants, and write a poem that takes its inspiration from, or incorporates the name of, one or more of these garden rarities. To help you out, here are links to the Southern Exposure Seed Exchange and the Baker Creek Seed Company. Also, here’s a hint – tomatoes seem to be prime territory for elaborate names. And who knows, maybe you’ll even find something to plant in your garden! Happy writing!

Please see NaPoWriMo for more information. Hated this prompt by the way! 

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Abundant Bloomsdale spinach: sounds tasty to me. You may think it’s odd but I like raw spinach in my salads.

Bisignano number two paste tomatoes: Not a huge fan of tomatoes unless, they’re in a sandwich, or made into tomato soup or sauce.

Cucuzzi Edible Gourd: I don’t think I’ve ever tasted a gourd; it’s not my kind of vegetable.

Dill, Long Island Mammoth: I love dill in certain dishes and foods. I especially adore dill pickles and nylsnki in dill sauce is heavenly.

Erlene’s Green Cotton: to make lovely cotton clothes out of; I love cotton in the summer to wear when it’s hot outside. Cotton breathes so it keeps you cool.

Four O’clock Don Pedro’s: mixed colours; don’t know what those are because I’m not a gardener. Flowers maybe?

German Johnson Tomato: I don’t know why there is so many kinds of Tomatos. The people in the Middle Ages thought they were poisonus you know.

Hopi Pink Flour Corn: Sounds like yummy corn to make flour with; is it truly pink?

Italiko Rosso Dandelion: Some people eat dandelions in salads, not me they’re weeds.

Jing Orange Okra seeds: I’m drawing a blank on what seedling this could be, but it sounds wonderful.

Katanya Watermelon: I wonder what this watermelon looks and tastes like? I hope it’s sweet and juicy.

Lemon Basil, Mrs Burns: This lady knew her basil; such a tasty spice in certain dishes. Is this basil lemony tasting? 

Morning Glory, Grandpa Ott’s: I believe this is a beautiful flower; I’m thinking of the song line, “What’s the story morning glory.”

Native American Po’suwaegeh Blue Corn Seed: Blue corn would be great,steamed or BBQ’d; then you can put butter and salt on it. Yum! 

Old Virginia Tomatos: Again, more tomato varieties?

Petunia, Old Fashioned Vining: They are such a pretty flower and petunias on vines, how lovely.

Quinoa, Cherry Vanilla:  I see you’re trying to make quinoa seem tasty; I hate it and Cherrry Vanilla makes it sound  grosser! 

Rosita Egg Plant: I would try this, only a bit.

Sorghum, Black Amber Cane:  1/4 lb, sugarcane I think. Love it, they make sugar from it! 

Toothache Plant: I think I’ll keep my distance.

Umbrian Cicerchia: Is it some kind of spice or maybe beans?

Vietnamese Mint or Balm: Mint is incredibly refreshing! Kills bugs around the baseboards too essential mint oil mixed in water.

Xiaohulu Gord: I’m pretty positive you cannot eat this kind of gourd.

Yarrow: What is yarrow?

Zuni gold bean: These beans sound delicious steamed with a bit of becel.

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©Mandibelle16.(2016) All Rights Reserved

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Writing 201 – prose/internal rhyme – Oranges and Napes


You love the smell of oranges. That sweet tangy delicious citrus flavour; it’s something to savour. You peel off an oranges thick pebbled skin and reveal the oval shaped raw fruit within; oranges remind you of summer scrapped  from spring’s cold paw. Summer is a season with no reason if you can believe. Sometimes it just rains and it’s a pain but the farmer’s need it for harvest. There are a variety of skins that fruit and vegetables hide in. Squash is orange with blemishes; and egg plant purple and posh;peaches have a fuzzy skin. You love eating peaches it’s such a sin. Or maybe it’s baking them into a crisp; there’s also cherries — black, dark red — swallowing their pits is a risk; and baby carrots that are nubby, you need to wash them with a little scrubbing. 

There are all kinds of skin, but the most delicate skin is human. Think of baby thighs and tummies – the most precious skin of all. Or the skin at the nape of your neck; that spot is hot, with a thousand sensory spots which a man can follow playing connect the dot and make a shape. But then you are reminded, you are in the kitchen peeling off orange skin while his lips graze your neck ending with a feeling filled peck. You’re at a loss  as you eat your orange slices thinking of vices and lips at your nape when he leaned over you whispering words you never suspected.