Haiku - 7,7,5, My Thoughts, Nonfiction, OctPoWriMo, Poetry, Religion/Morality, Writing, Writing Challenges

#OctPoWriMo – Day 30/31 – Senryu – “Eternity for Real” #amwriting #poetry #religion #christianity #faith


Day 31 Prompt: Eternal

“When I think of eternal, I think there isn’t much that is eternal, at least not on this earth. When I wrote this prompt, I believe I was thinking how even though OctPoWriMo is coming to an end, our words are forever – what we wrote during this month and beyond. What does eternal mean to you?” 
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“Truly, truly, I say to you, he who hears My word, and believes Him who sent Me, has eternal life, and does not come into judgment, but has passed out of death into life.” –John 5:24

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http://www.pinterest.com
 

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Time on earth is done, 
When my body is only, 
An Empty vessel. 

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Then shall eternity —

Begin; time will not matter. 

For all those gone on. 

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Time on earth, linear, 

Comprehend forever, 

It’s hard imagining.

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What forever is, 

What it looks like and feels like, 

Who the maker is? 

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Death is frightening, 

Even in sleep, will it hurt? 

Where does our soul go? 

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This is why I think, 

Believing in God is wise, 

We can worry less.

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Perhaps worry not —

At all; because we know what —

The otherside will bring.

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Many say we’re wrong, 

There’s no heaven, there’s no hell.

I learned fear of God.

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Not that we should be —

Afraid of benevolent —

King; but his word speaks. 

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Gives us hope for life, 

Eternal in Jesus dying for —

Everything done wrong.

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We’re not perfect and —

We never will be, we can’t 

Keep the Ten Commandments. 

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Fulfilling God’s law, 

Impossible to achieve, 

So he sent Jesus.

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He hung on a cross, 

Cruxifician painful, bled. 

He died went to Hell.

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Defeated devil, 

Defeated death and the grave, 

So with him remain.

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When our death comes there —

Is no sting, because those who —

Have faith, believe — live.

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That is eternity, 

Heaven with God, better than —

Our wildest dreams. 

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Forgiveness of sin, 

Becoming perfect beings, 

Paradise for real. 

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Thank you for following me for #OctPoWriMo. Sorry, I’m behind on my usual prompts! I will catch up and am following a new themed daily prompt for November. Stay tuned 🙂 

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©Mandibelle16. (2016)All Rights Reserved.

Event, My Thoughts, Nonfiction, Poetry, Religion/Morality, Writing

Fascinating Connections in History, Literature, and Philosophy.


Thanks to The Daily Post for the prompt word connection.

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http://www.en.wikipedia.org

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Connections are something I’m passionate about. I enjoy the connections ideas have with one another.When I was in university, my major concentration of study was English Literature because I loved to read, write, and hear stories. Later in my studies, in my third or fourth year, I learned about ‘New Historicism’ in a Literary Criticism Course. New historist’s believe that: “what is history is textual and what is textual is history.” 

When we write about history we are also writing something literary and vice versa. This is because the writer’s beliefs, or the beliefs of the regime the writer was working under, affect their work. The ideas of ‘New Historicism’ made a fascinating connection for me between my English Major and History Minor.

Many kings such as Charlemagne (768 AD) for instance, had books written about them. These books made them appear to readers and history in a certain light. Charlemagne (or Charles the Great) United Western Europe, laying the grounds for France and Germany. He also was a huge supporter of the Papacy because the Pope legitimized him as a King ordained by God. Perhaps, that is one of the most extraordinaire tactics Charlemagne takes, he makes Western Europe Christian. Charlemagne would have his writers (monks) leave out any details that might make history look back on him in a less then ideal way. But history can often be no more than stories based on a few facts, it might be more literature than historically accurate. 

An example of this is the epic poem, The Song of Roland. The epic poem is French literature that takes place during Charlemagne’s reign. It is the oldest surviving work of French literature. The poem is about the Battle of Ronceveax, a historically accurate battle. Charlemagne’s army is fighting the Muslim armies in Spain when they are tricked. The French army is annihilated, until Charlemagne arrives and defeats the Muslims. The character Roland and the French army have no qualms about bravely dying for their king. They appear noble. They are not like many of today’s anti-heros who are scared to die and do not have much in the way of fighting skills. Medieval heros were written to appear strong and divinely blessed (such as Roland) so history would look back on them in a favourable way according the values of the time, and of their Kings.

Another connection to history and literature is philosophy — which was almost was my second minor. What the great minds of a time period were thinking, influences the historical events of the time and the way literature was written. Thomas Aquainius for example, a philosopher in the 1400’s, believed in ‘natural theology’ as a priest for the Catholic Church. Much of his work was based off of Aristotle’s works, especially Aquinius’ famous Summa Theologica. 

Catholicism regards Aquinas as a Saint and a model for priesthood. He influenced religion in his time (and now) and his philosophical work on Aristotle had an effect on literature being written. Aquainus’ views such as his beliefs on ‘virtue’ effect the history of the Catholic Church in the sense that Aquinas’ beliefs were the image the Papacy liked to portray.

In the latter Middle Ages, Renaissance and beyond, Catholic clergy such as the Pope and Cardinals, held a great deal of influence, similar to that of Kings. They commanded armies and despite Catholic teachings of celibacy, had wives and families. Peasants were sold items such as ‘indulgences’ to save their ancestor from purgatory, or to help buy their own way from hell. The focus was taken off how Jesus would save you if you believed in him to what you could do to get into heaven. 

Clearly, history was deviating from what Acquinas taught and wrote. In this case what was written in literature was philosophical, but not the actual history occurring. I’m sure at the time, the Papacy would have argued that what they were doing was perfectly in line with Aquanius and the teachings of the Catholicism. This is why in part, a Reformation in religion occurrs in the 1600’s.

For the most part, I found my studies of philosophy, history, and literature to be connected. For many events, history is not what we think it is. Actual history is influenced by opinion and thought – our philosophies and beliefs. History to a large degree can be made-up or embellished and is more so literature than a sound historical account. But literature can have sound philosophical beliefs behind it. This is a fascinating and complex way to look at how ideas connect with what occurs in our lives, what we write, and what we believe.

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http://www.en.wikipedia.org

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©Mandibelle16. All Rights Reserved.

Poetry, Writing

Writing 101 – Vortex


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Vortex (Definition) Merriam-Webster Dictionary Online

1.something that resembles a whirlpool

2.a. a mass of fluid (as a liquid) with a whirling or circular motion that tends to form a cavity or a vacuum in the center of the circle and to draw toward this cavity or vacuum bodies subject to its action;

b.a region within a body of fluid in which the fluid elements have an angular velocity

plural vortices also vortexes

To Whom It May Concern:

Have you ever looked at life and wondered if it was just some giant vortex waiting to pull us down into its whirling center and suck us dry? Doesn’t it seem to you that at some points in life we have no choice but to be pulled down into the whirlpool and face whatever meets us there.

What I’m trying to say is this: at times we go about life happily and unaware of the bad stuff that is about to effect us. We don’t even stop to think that there is something out there waiting to pull us down from our content reality. We think that we’re not in any danger, we believe that our life is just going to go along in the fantastic or at least normal way that is has gone then, wam! We are in this giant vortex and no matter what we do we can’t seem to wriggle our way our way out of  our problems or a situation we could potentially find growth in.

A Canadian poet, Margaret Avison, once described a vortex as whirlpool. That the whirlpool was a defining moment in our life and different people faced this defining moment in 3 different ways. Here is the poem so you might read it; it’s one of my favorites from high school. It’s called The Swimmer’s Moment.

THE SWIMMER’S MOMENT

Margaret Avison
From:   Winter Sun. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1962. pp.36

For everyone
The swimmer’s moment at the whirlpool comes,
But many at that moment will not say
“This is the whirlpool, then.”
By their refusal they are saved
From the black pit, and also from contesting
The deadly rapids, and emerging in
The mysterious, and more ample, further waters.
And so their bland-blank faces turn and turn
Pale and forever on the rim of suction
They will not recognize.
Of those who dare the knowledge
Many are whirled into the ominous centre
That, gaping vertical, seals up
For them an eternal boon of privacy,
So that we turn away from their defeat
With a despair, not for their deaths, but for
Ourselves, who cannot penetrate their secret
Nor even guess at the anonymous breadth
Where one or two have won:
(The silver reaches of the estuary).

I think that I love this poem because it demonstrates how we — the swimmer — face the difficult or defining moments in our life. Some people see that moment (the whirlpool) and do not realize it is a defining moment in their life. They are saved from “the black pit and also from contesting” because they never try to see the grand and great wonders that could be on the other side of the vortex (the whirlpool). They never get to see ” [t]he mysterious, and ample, further waters.” In fact, Avison writes that those who do not dare the whirlpool miss their purpose, a greater knowledge because they are too afraid to swim into the vortexes in their life.

Those who never risk also do not recognize the “eternal boon of privacy” of those “whirled (in the vortex’s) ominous center” and who  are defeated by the whirlpool. Not all of us make it past the defining moments in our lives. Some of us are destroyed by them but I think Avison believes it is still worth it to take risks and enter the whirlpool. Even those who are gone, who we ” . .  . despair, not for the deaths, but for / [o]urselves who cannot penetrate their secret,” even in risking themselves those who are defeated by the whirlpool have gained a knowledge that those of us who have never swam into the whirlpool cannot guess at.

Nor can those who have not “penetrated” the whirlpool, swam into the vortex, understand “[w]here one or two have won /( [t]he silver reaches of the estuary). ” Some people set out to meet their defining moment at the whirlpools edge and they swim through the vortex of the whirlpool and come out with a special knowledge, with a special purpose, having gained wonderful and subliminal riches by taking their swimmer’s moment at the whirlpools edge.

I think in this poem Avison encourages us to take risks in our lives. So when it seems like everything is going fine and you become sucked into a vortex, something new and exciting, somewhere or something where we are at our own peril please take up  that challenge. You will never see  ” . . . the silver reaches of the estuary.” what magnificent adventures await you in life if you don’t set out to find your purpose. You will never gain knowledge and gain a deeper understanding of yourself, if you cannot meet the challenges of the “[t]he [s]wimmer’s [m]oment” in your lives. If you cannot make it through the bad times, the times that make you grow, and understand yourself as a person, you will be missing out. Your loss will be greater than those people who risk bad times in their lives and never make it through them.

Sincerely,

Amanda

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