Sunday Photo Fiction: The Exception #amwriting #flashfiction #history


Thanks to Alastair Forbes for holding this week’s SPF. 

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Credit: A Mixed Bag

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The White Horse is a popular bar and inn for tourists to stay at while visiting museums and decaying buildings in town. 

Many old ones have been restored in the style of their time period. However, some buildings have rotted away. These past glories are left in ruin because they cannot be torn down as historical sites. 

Although some people wish to restore these ancient buildings, the process of doing this correctly, with trades who are trained in forgotten skills, is frustrating. As well, there are a plethora of permits needed from the city, county, and state, along with, random inspections.

Architects and knowledgable art history professors complain, saying that the quality of work by rare trades is not accurate. Or perhaps, they say the right materials have not been used, despite these materials now being nonexistent. But few so-called experts understand that the price paid for not restoring ancient buildings is having them collapse, having history disappear. 

The White Horse, however, is an exception to such procedures. The popular bar and inn has been passed down from generations of family since the thirteen-hundreds. Over time, the same lineage has updated the bar and inn through each successive family. The building  contains upgrades from the fourteenth century until early 2010. 

For some reason, there isn’t much any government official or anyone else, can say about this. The same family line has lived here for over seven-hundred-years, having always owned the bar and inn. Can the state and historical societies reprimand them now? Not likely. 

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©Mandibelle16. (2017) All Rights Reserved. 

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14 thoughts on “Sunday Photo Fiction: The Exception #amwriting #flashfiction #history”

      1. Lol. Thank you. Funny enough a lot of history is Emuch more literature than actual history. For instance, you didn’t want to write badly about most monarchs when they were alive so a lot of liberty might be taken in describing them. Thanks again 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

    1. Do you know I wasn’t even thinking of that but it’s a fascinating idea for sure. I was just thinking they were very careful where marriages were concerned and who the inn was passed down to down the line. The situation being extremely rare — especially when the plague came lol.

      Liked by 1 person

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